The ‘V’ word.

I need help! I know, I know, a good friend said to me “don’t start getting interested in those little gem of cameras manufactured by the West German company Voigtlander. But did I listen?, NO!


Anyway, I thought I was fighting it but didn’t realise how fast the addiction takes hold of you. I just clicked on the ebay app and ‘Damn’ it was still set for the search for the ‘V’ word, and there they were, a pair of Voigtlander Bs.


As we all know, it’s better to get a pair of something, right! think of a pair of Purdey shotguns, or a pair of shoes, well maybe that’s not a good example.
Anyway there they were on the page staring back at me and they didn’t need bidding on as they were ‘Buy now’. That dreaded term ‘Buy now’ as if you can’t resist. But, I did resist for a couple of days, I think in the hope that someone else would ‘Buy now’ and leave me free to a normal life without the ‘V’ (see I can’t even say the full word, in case the affliction takes hold).
So, eventually I did buy the pair of Vito Bs which I didn’t think were overpriced as the seller said they both worked and one had a very nice brown leather case with it.

The Vito B has an unusual film load as part of the base of the camera hinges open to then allow the back to swing open. It is held in place with a very nice little catch which is typical German engineering and very detailed.


The next stage is to put film through them so we’re all set to go for a photography outing which has been put on hold for the stormy weather to pass as I don’t think these little jobies will stand getting a soaking.

St Peters Church, Little Hanningfield.

From evidence in the north wall, the parish church of St Peter’s originated in the late 12th or early 13th century. The windows and glass reflect the history of the church and its time.

HISTORY: The nave is late C11 or very early C12 in origin. The chancel is of uncertain medieval date, but may be late C12 or early C13. The nave was lengthened to the west and possibly widened to the south in the C15, when the bell turret was also built. The south porch is also of this date, and the nave roof may be contemporary. The chancel was party rebuilt in 1850, and the church was further restored in 1883-4 by Frederic Chancellor (1825-1918), a well known church architect who worked widely in Essex and was mayor of Chelmsford seven times from 1888.

A day in Elsecar and another film camera purchase.

Elsecar Heritage Centre is a collection of buildings in Barnsley which are now of listed building status of historical architectural heritage. Now a collection of shops and craft workshops, they were originally built to support the adjacent mine workings, ironworks and railway. Built in 1850, they were reopened in 1987 in their present guise.

The clock shop in the centre.
The clock repairer.
The crossing for the steam railway.
The Newcomen Beam engine.

The mine workings in this area were some of the deepest in the area. To access the deep workings required the installation of this beam engine to extract the water. It ran from 1795 to 1923 and is now the oldest example of a beam engine in the country that is still situated in it’s original position. It can now only be operated with the assistance of a hydraulic pump due to the dilapidated state of its steam powered engine.

The busy antiques centre.
I did consider getting a new phone but thought I probably wouldn’t be able to get social media on this one 😅
I saw this box pushed up the corner of one of the areas of the antique shop and with some excitement opened it up and found a very nice little film camera in almost perfect condition, complete with its manual.
Voigtlander Vito C. Hardly any marks on it and the case looked like it hadn’t been used. Not a bad buy for £15. Can’t wait to try it out!

Tutankhamun at the Saatchi

King at 9 years old and dead by age 19. Tutankhamun’s body laid at rest until discovered by Howard Carter 3000 years later. So why is this Pharaoh so important? it’s because so far his tomb is the only one so far to be unearthed with so many of it’s riches intact including the solid gold coffin of the Pharaoh containing his mummified remains.

On Thursday members of Thorley U3A visited the exhibition at the Saatchi Gallery in London. The exhibition commemorates the 100th anniversary of the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb, and is the final chance to see these glittering world heritage artefacts before they return to Egypt forever.

The exhibition explores the life of King Tutankhamun through more than 150 of the pieces found in tomb – more than 60 of which are travelling outside of Egypt for the first time.

Wooden ,painted box which held different cuts of meat. Meant to sustain the Pharaoh on his journey to the Afterlife.
To keep these foods fresh until the end of time, the Egyptians mummified them—slowly drying them with salt, bandaging them and covering the bundle with resins—much as they would a human body.
Red wooden semicircular box and lid inlaid with ebony and ivory with cartouches of Tutankahamun.
Gilded wooden ‘Ostrich Hunt’ fan.
The inscription on the stick says that Tutankhamun hunted ostriches in the desert near Heliopolis and provided feathers for this fan.
Gilded wooden statue of Ptah. Ptah wears a cobalt blue glass skullcap. In Egyptian mythology Ptah is the god of craftsmen and architects. The three hieroglyphs on his sceptre are: ankh (life), the djed pillar (stability), and the was sign (sovereingnty).